May Is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

admin
Federal, State and local highway safety, law enforcement, and motorcycle organizations together proclaim May as "Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month."

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says one out of every nine U.S. road fatalities accounted for last year involved motorcycle riders. The agency says motorcycle fatalities now account for 11 percent of total road fatalities and have increased each year from a low of 2,116 in 1997 to 4,810 in 2006.

To help spread the word, the NHTSA has prepared a promotional planner to be used by communities, businesses and press outlets.

The NHTSA says the intent of the promotional planner is to provide entities with media tools and marketing materials and ideas that can be distributed to fit local needs and objectives while at the same time partnering with other states, communities and organizations all across the country on a single promotional program.

The marketing planner includes messaging to support your initiatives surrounding Motorcycle Safety Month. The materials available can be used in several capacities to reinforce the message platform and all carry the tagline, "Share the Road with Motorcycles" to remind drivers to be cognizant of motorcycle riders during the busier riding months.

Media options include a News Release, Letter to the Editor, Op-Ed Article, Fact Sheet, Proclamation and Logos, all available in English and Spanish.

Also among the creative materials available free of charge: Five posters, each offering individual messages promoting sharing roadways with motorcyclists. NHTSA says the posters would be well suited for use at retail outlets, restaurants, grocery stores and other venues that would reach the general populace.

Tough
This poster/print advertisement depicts the stereotypical biker, complete with motorcycle, riding gear and attitude. The headline, which reads "Tough on the Outside. Soft and Squishy on the Inside", reminds readers that as tough as some bikers may be, we are all susceptible to potential accidents and injuries. It also serves to remind motorcyclists of the dangers of the road and reminds them of their own infallibility and the fact that other vehicles may have difficulty in seeing them due to their smaller size.

Crumpled
This poster/print advertisement also depicts the stereotypical biker and carries the headline, "They're Not As Tough As They Look." The headline is reinforced by using a crumpled piece of paper to emphasize the fragility and vulnerability of riders to automobiles.

Objects In Mirror
This poster/print advertisement visually demonstrates the narrow swath that a motorcycle rider has in comparison to normal traffic. The headline, which reads "Objects in Mirror are More Vulnerable than They Appear," is a play on standard side mirror verbiage and serves to deliver the message that drivers need to be alert to motorcycle traffic and that motorcyclists are more susceptible to potential accidents and injuries. It also serves to remind motorcyclists of the dangers of the road and reminds them of their own infallibility and the fact that other vehicles may have difficulty in seeing them due to their smaller size.

Endangered Species
This poster/print advertisement depicts a lone rider on a country road and urges readers/drivers to be aware of fellow motorcyclists to keep them safe. The headline, which reads "Help Us Take Motorcyclists off the Endangered Species List", reminds drivers that motorcyclists face many more dangers on the road than automobiles.

Spotting
This poster/print advertisement depicts a rider obscured amid a sea of traffic. The headline, which reads "Spotting a Motorcycle on the Road can be just as hard", plays off the visual in reminding drivers of how difficult it may be to see riders and that they need to be cognizant of motorcyclists.